Should new shooters learn on iron sights and “graduate” up to optics? Or is it better to boost a novice marksman’s confidence by letting them use “easy mode” on a rifle equipped with a scope or red dot style optic? Watch the video and give us your two cents below!

In general, should new shooters learn on iron sights before using optics, or is it better to use a scope while learning the other basics?


Did you enjoy this article?

Share this article with your friends!

Leave a Comment Below

6 Responses to “Make Up Your Mind Monday: Optics vs. Iron Sights”

  1. Jon Register

    Iron sights first. i believe in learning the basics first and then learn new skills as you can.

    Reply
  2. Ranger Falcon

    Master Iron sight shooting first then move on to optics. Optics always seem to fail when you need them most.

    Reply
  3. Joe Ondish

    I definitely agree with the iron sight mentality first. I don't necessarily agree with the thought that you need to master irons sights before moving on to glass, but having a clear understanding and being confident and effective with them is key. With the technology put into glass today, it's very rare to see a quality optic fail. In that rare case, the back up iron sights help you get through whatever it is you need until that optic can be replaced.

    Reply
  4. Joel McCracken

    Depends on the desire of the first time shooter, and the context of the training session. If I have a liberal friend who believes that it is easy to kill 200 people with a 30 round magazine, I am not giving them my EOTech AR15. I'll give them my irons SKS, and show them the skill required. If I have a good friend that is scared of guns but interested (my wife) i'll put a red dot sight with light ammo to get fun of the sport, so I can teach the simplified basics, then work towards the more complex techniques.

    Reply
  5. Kirk Kinnell

    Irons so you know what a sight picture is…….clearly.

    Reply
  6. Ken Swolley

    My son has learned the same way I did as a boy, iron sight, single shot .22 rifle. I gave him a Cricket for his 10th birthday a few years ago and after a few times at the range he has become very proficient in keeping all the ammo I give him to shoot in the center of the target. One shot and then manual reloading teaches making your shots count. There isn't a rabbit or squirrel around that is safe if he sees it.
    He tried my 10-22 that has a scope on it and didn't much care for it. Went back to the Cricket, but now that he's getting a little bigger he's been looking at my old Marlin 60 that I put a rear peep on.

    Reply

Leave a Reply